Scottish Early Bronze Age metalwork

John Coles (Author)


Keyword(s):
Gravegroups Hoards Metal, Knives Tanged Daggers, Knives Halberds, Beads, Metalwork, Stone, Knife
Period(s):
Early 16th Centuries, Later 16th, Early Bronze Age, 17th, 15th Centuries, 18th Century Bc

Abstract


Evidence provided by grave-groups, hoards, metal analyses and correlations with stone moulds is used in conjunction with typology and distribution to establish a sequence of three industrial phases. Local production of metalwork began in the 18th century BC, and the first real industrial phase, Migdale, includes broad- and thin-butted flat axes, riveted flat knives, tanged daggers, spiral armlets and tubular beads, using Scottish or Irish ore-sources. The Colleonard phase in the 17th and early 16th centuries is characterised by the production of thin-butted axes, riveted knives, halberds, bar armlets and awls. Goldwork in the form of pommel-mounts, ear-rings and lunulae is attributed primarily to this phase. Flanged axes, spearheads and new forms of knife appear in the later 16th and 15th centuries during the Gavel Moss phase. A R

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Published
30-11-1969
How to Cite
Coles, J. (1969). Scottish Early Bronze Age metalwork. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 101, 1-110. Retrieved from http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/view/8746
Section
Articles