Leather guns and other light artillery in mid-17th century Scotland

David Stevenson (Author)

David Caldwell (Author)


Keyword(s):
Leather, Metal Barrel
Period(s):
17th Century

Abstract


Leather guns were a 17th century experiment in gun manufacture that began in Switzerland and was adopted in Scotland. Their advantage was lightness: a relatively thin metal barrel was tightly wound with rope, wire or cord and encased in leather. Twenty-three such guns exist in Scotland, representing six types, and as a whole are distinguished from other European examples by several special features. James Wemyss in Fife was the principal Scottish maker, and a full discussion of the historical background is provided. A R

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Published
30-11-1977
How to Cite
Stevenson, D., & Caldwell, D. (1977). Leather guns and other light artillery in mid-17th century Scotland. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 108, 300-317. Retrieved from http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/view/8975
Section
Articles

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