The So-called Catrail

James Craw (Author)


Keyword(s):
Mound, Grims Dykes
Period(s):
1636

Abstract


In many districts of our country, from the South of England northwards, there exist works of unknown antiquity called black-dykes, devil's-dykes, Grim's dykes, and other such names. They consist of a trench with an accompanying mound, of widely varying dimensions, and run across country with a curiously winding course, being frequently traceable for many miles. The most famous in Scotland has become known as the Catrail. The conception of a continuous line, or of a series of more or less\r\nconnected sections forming a unit, appears to be without foundation. It is argued that five separate parts can be identified and these are described in detail.

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Published
30-11-1924
How to Cite
Craw, J. (1924). The So-called Catrail. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 58, 40-44. Retrieved from http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/view/7594
Section
Articles